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July 2007

posted July 5, 2007, revised July 14, 2007

Friends of Dufferin Grove Park Newsletter

Comments? editor@dufferinpark.ca

Volume 8 Number 7, July 2007

The marshals from last month's
Cooking Fire Theatre Festival.
photo by Wallie Seto

Editorial

posted July 14, 2007

ANOTHER NOISY BIO-TOILET MEETING

Friday July 13, 2007

The playground’s cob courtyard (its thick walls made with “cob” – i.e. clay, sand, straw, and water mixed together – a bit like adobe) was originally built to frame the required public-health sinks for the wading pool snack bar. During the summer of 2005, about five hundred people participated with park user and builder Georgie Donais to shape that little courtyard, with more than just sinks -- a fireplace and a green roof and even a baby changing station. But one element was still missing: a toilet handy to the playground. Playground users have been asking for such a facility for many years, but there was never enough money – building a new park washroom costs between $150,000 and $350,000. What to do?

Georgie began to research the newer kind of industrial-strength composting toilets that are increasingly used in public spaces where location and circumstances prohibit standard plumbing hook-up. She visited such installations, made phone calls all over the country, consulted with the park managers, and applied for a grant to help build a simple cob shelter around a “Phoenix” brand composting bio-toilet. She found a donor for the $9000 toilet. She designed a cob shelter with bas-relief sculptures in the walls, and the Toronto Arts Council approved a $10,000 “Community Arts” grant. The park’s Recreation staff helped Georgie to set up a playground meeting to discuss the project. Work (with volunteer help) began in July 2006.

But then concern among some park neighbours that the toilet would be more like a smelly chemical toilet than an ecological break-through, put the project on pause. A large community meeting reaffirmed broad support for the project, but continuing opposition even made the bio-toilet a local issue in the November municipal elections. The Parks department, interested in the possibilities of park toilets which don’t require costly plumbing infrastructure, hired Martin Liefhebber, an architect well-known for his green credentials. The City followed up by hiring engineer Kharyn Chau to help the small cob toilet housing meet the building code. (The building code does not specifically address earthen building processes, so the engineer has had to work hard.) Now the engineer and the architect, consulting with Georgie, have almost finished adapting the toilet and its building to the regulations.

So on Friday July 13 City Councillor Adam Giambrone held another information meeting. This was the fourth public discussion meeting about the subject, and the crowd had distinctly dwindled from the last time, but there were still about 25 people pro and 8 against (plus several people there to protest the Lansdowne road narrowing). The convictions of the people on either side of the toilet did not seem to alter in any way, and at times the meeting became so noisy that the Councillor said he would have to leave if people did not allow him to chair.

Where that leaves the bio-toilet: Parks supervisor Peter Leiss confirmed that the City is committed to trying the Phoenix toilet as a pilot project. He said there’s no City money for any new plumbed toilets, and although a company might be found to fund them, that would come along with the right to have advertising inside a city park – not yet permitted by the City. (Italics are Peter’s). The modifications to the toilet and its little cob enclosure will increase the cost of the project to about $15,000 more than the money raised for it. There is good hope that the City will be able to cover that cost, especially since bio-toilets seem to be the coming thing: the City of Edmonton has commissioned a bank of Phoenix bio-toilets near its downtown, a similar model is reportedly servicing the busiest zoo in Japan, and the Toronto Region Conservation Authority has installed some ‘eco-toilets’ in their office building in Vaughan. Hopefully the toilet will win over its opponents when it’s actually built – a real, existing bio-toilet may be worth a thousand words.

SPECIAL EVENTS IN JULY

THEATRE IN THE PARK: Clay and Paper Theatre presents WE NEED HELP. A play about the end of oil.

July 18 to July 22, July 25 to July 29, August 1 to August 6, 7.30 pm, outdoors in the park

From director David Anderson:

“Giant puppets and live jazz animate this outdoor performance about what happens when the road less traveled becomes the highway to hell. A honeymooning couple is stranded in Northern Ontario when the world’s gas tank runs dry.”

Admission: pay what you can, $10 recommended.

GET YOUR CAR WASHED!

When the weather is dry, cars can get extra dusty. They need extra washing, and Dufferin Grove Park is the place to go. There are three fund-raiser car washes at the northwest end of the park this month:

  • Sunday July 15 8 am – 4 pm: Portugal soccer club
  • Friday July 20, 1- 4 pm: Wallace-Emerson summer camp
  • Saturday July 21, 10 am – 4 pm: Toronto Eagles soccer club

Just drive up the dead end across from the mall lights and watch the kids sudse, rinse, and polish your car to make it look like new. Then put some money in their fund. A win-win.

"Ring Around the Moon" traditional circle games

Thursdays July 5, 12, 19, 26 starting at 6:30 p.m.

Four Thursdays of traditional circle games with children’s librarian Theo Heras: Circle Games for the entire family -- all are welcome. Theo Heras is the children's librarian at the Lillian H. Smith Branch of the Toronto Public Library, where she runs a very popular baby program. She also performs at the Franklin Children's Garden on Centre Island. Theo is the author/singer of the book/CD called “What Will We Do with the Baby-o?”

STILL A FEW SPACES IN ARTS PROGRAMS

FOR THOSE BORED OLDER KIDS

Thursday drama classes

July 12 to August 30.
Ages 6-9 every Thursday 2:00-3:00, and ages 10-13 every Thursday 3:00-4:00.

Drama classes, held outdoors (weather permitting). The children make small plays, learn new stories, write poems and scenes, and play in a friendly, inspiring and enjoyable way. A younger group focuses on creative play, improvisation and storytelling, while an older group experiments with making scenes, devising plots and writing original stories from poems and bits of history. Both classes integrate movement, traditional storytelling, improvisation, silly games, writing and exploring the world of the park. Kate Cayley, who leads the classes, has four years experience teaching drama and creative writing to children, as well as working professionally as a theatre director and writer, and as artistic director of Dufferin Grove Park's Cooking Fire Theatre Festival.

Suggested donation is $85 per child for 8 classes (sliding scale available, particularly for families wishing to register more than one child.) Space is limited! For more information or to register please email Kate: katecayley@gmail.com or call 416-538-6084 (e-mail preferred.)

Kid’s Papier-mâché Camp , ages 8-12

with artist Erin Robertson July 16 – 20, 9am – 5 pm.

From Lyla Rye:

“Spend 5 days in the park developing your own papier-mâché sculpture on the theme of: Wild in the City. You will learn how to make a wire armature and cover it with papier-mâché. You then get to paint and collage on it. On Friday, the whole group will display their artwork in a large diorama. Each morning and afternoon a couple of hours will be spent on art and during breaks you’ll go to the wading pool, playground or the pizza oven.”

This all-day camp costs $150.00 for the week (there is one bursary where a kid can join for free). This amount covers all materials and on snack a day provided. Contact Lyla at lylarye@sympatico.ca. or call her at 416-536-6381.

Kids’ Art Camp in the park with Jeannie Soley and Gillian Tremain.

July 17 - 20 (from 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. each day for four days)

Shibori for Girls: The art of Japanese tie-dye. This 4-day workshop is aimed primarily at girls, as the main project will be a wrap-around summer skirt, using a traditional tie-dye technique known as shibori. Nimble fingers are a definite requirement, as well as good concentration; the initial part of the project involves tying many tiny knots! The girls will also have the opportunity to try various ways of embellishing their skirts even further : embroidery threads, beads and over-painting techniques. There will be a secondary activity interspersed with the main project, as a way to give the kids time to absorb what they've learned. There will be room for one bursary.

From Gillian:

This camp will suit girls ages 9 and up. We'll take a maximum of 10 kids. Cost yet to be determined. To register, please email Gillian at gillyt@ca.inter.net or Jeannie at fjsoley@hotmail.com or call 416-532-0773.

REGULAR PARK EVENTS

PIZZA DAYS:

The bake oven is available three times a week for people to make their own pizzas. The open times are Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 12 noon to 2 pm, and Sundays from 1 to 3 pm. For $2 you get a lump of dough made in the park kitchen, plus some tomato sauce and some grated cheese (both from No Frills across the street). As the herbs and the little tomatoes and peppers ripen in the park gardens, pizza makers can go into the gardens and pick additional toppings there – no charge.

For groups and birthday parties, people can book

  • Tuesdays from 2-3pm,
  • Wednesdays from 11-12pm, and
  • Sundays 12-1pm and 3-4pm.

The cost is $45 for additional staffing plus $2 per pizza.

CAMPFIRES:

Three park staff take campfire bookings: Anna Bekerman, Mayssan Shuja, and Amy Withers. The bookings used to be less formal but this year they must be made two business days before the campfire. As in other years, park staff lend out the cooking grill and help with kindling if they have extra – other wood must usually be brought from home. Park staff also provide two buckets with water and a shovel (to shovel sand on the fire and extinguish it at the end). There are no permits for bonfires, only for small, pleasant campfires. Sing-songs are very nice, but there can be no drumming, it’s too disturbing to the neighbourhood. All fire permits are over at 11 pm.

This past winter the CELOS library added a wonderful book on cooking with fire, which is in the reference section of the rink house kitchen. Anyone is welcome to read it there.

THURSDAY DRAMA CLASSES FOR KIDS:

July 12 to August 30.
  • ages 6-9 every Thursday 2:00-3:00, and
  • ages 10-13 every Thursday 3:00-4:00.

Drama classes, held outdoors (weather permitting). The children make small plays, learn new stories, write poems and scenes, and play in a friendly, inspiring and enjoyable way. A younger group focuses on creative play, improvisation and storytelling, while an older group experiments with making scenes, devising plots and writing original stories from poems and bits of history. Both classes integrate movement, traditional storytelling, improvisation, silly games, writing and exploring the world of the park. Kate Cayley, who leads the classes, has four years experience teaching drama and creative writing to children, as well as working professionally as a theatre director and writer, and as artistic director of Dufferin Grove Park's Cooking Fire Theatre Festival.

Suggested donation is $85 per child for 8 classes (sliding scale available, particularly for families wishing to register more than one child.) Space is limited! For more information or to register please email Kate: katecayley@gmail.com or call 416-538-6084 (e-mail preferred.)

SPECIAL MEETINGS

COMMUNITY WADING POOL CONSULTATION:

Wednesday July 11 2007, 7 pm

The Dufferin Grove wading pool was built around 1950. Some of the pipes are still the original ones – and they sure are rusty! The City of Toronto has a budget fund called “state of good repair,” and the wading pool’s number has come up. City Councillor Adam Giambrone says that around $250,000 (!) is earmarked to rebuild the pool from scratch. The city has already hired a consultant to create a design (see the end of this article for the drawings).

Now city staff and the architect are ready to consult wading pool users for their thoughts on the plan. The drawings are posted by the pool. On July 11 City of Toronto capital development staff and the architect will explain the plans and give park users a chance to respond. Recreation staff will keep the pool and the snack bar open during the first part of that meeting, to make it easier for wading pool users to attend.

Wading pool staff will also take down comments and suggestions from wading pool users who are not able to make it to the meeting. Or you can e-mail comments to mail@dufferinpark.ca (specify if you don’t want them to be posted on the web).

For the existing pool plans see WadingPool213-L-01-2007-06-22ext.pdf. For the plans for the new wading pool see WadingPool213-L-01_2007-06-22rev1.pdf.

Email from Jutta Mason after the meeting:

I think this meeting was pretty good and interesting. Afterwards the landscape architect went around with the wading pool staff and they got into some operational details that will also help.

Sounds like the double asphalt access will be reduced to a single path, and they're going to cost out another wheelchair access path from the entrance on Havelock.

Sounds like the tap for sandy feet will be no problem.

Some months ago there was a concern about water being wasted at the sandpit: the architect said that the drain for the foot washing station can double as a drain for the sandpit run-off, involving a French drain and even weeping tile to disperse the water toward the trees.

And going one better: the wading pool puts an even greater amount of water down the drain every day (than the sandpit). So the architect is going to check out a capped diversion drain that could be hooked up to an underground storage tank when the provincial wastewater regulations change (soon). That would mean we'd have the capacity to use ALL the wading pool water to run hoses to the trees.

So there is some real ecological innovation involved here. The councillor said the revised plan will be made public within weeks.

Jutta

INFORMATION SESSION ABOUT THE PLAYGROUND BIO-TOILET:

Friday July 13, 2007, 7 pm by the playground.

The playground’s cob courtyard (its thick walls made with “cob” – i.e. clay, sand, straw, and water mixed together – a bit like adobe) was originally built to frame the public-health sinks for the wading pool snack bar. During the summer of 2005, about five hundred people participated with park user and builder Georgie Donais to shape that little courtyard, and it ended up having more than sinks -- a fireplace and a green roof and even a baby changing station. But one element was still missing: a toilet handy to the playground. Playground users have been asking for such a facility for many years, but there was never enough money – building a new park washroom costs around $100,000. What to do?

When a park visitor told of his good experiences with the new industrial-strength composting toilets in the U.S., and then even offered to donate one (value: $8000), it seemed like the problem of the missing toilet could be solved.

Georgie researched the kind of toilets that are commonly used where location and circumstances prohibit standard plumbing hook-up, and found a brand of composting toilet that held promise. She visited such installations, made phone calls all over the country, consulted with the park managers, and applied for a grant to help build a simple cob shelter around a “Phoenix” brand composting bio-toilet. The plans called for bas-relief sculptures all around the shelter’s walls, and the Toronto Arts Council approved a $10,000 “Community Arts” grant.

Work began in the summer of 2005. But then concern among some park neighbours that the toilet would be more like a smelly chemical toilet than an ecological break-through, put the project on pause. The Parks Department, interested in the possibilities of such toilets for parks which haven’t got the plumbing infrastructure, hired Martin Liefhebber, an architect well-known for his green credentials. The City followed up by hiring an engineer too, who could help the small cob toilet housing meet the building code. The building code does not specifically address earthen building processes, so the engineer has had to work hard. Now the engineer and the architect, consulting with Georgie, have almost finished adapting the building to the regulations. City Councillor Adam Giambrone says it’s time to hold an information meeting to show how the playground toilet can be constructed, in all its details. But the steel supports they recommend for the cob housing will increase the cost of the toilet by an yet-unknown amount, perhaps many thousands of dollars.

All the building details – architectural drawings, CSA-approved bio-toilet standards, sketches of the sculptural elements of the building walls – will be posted at the wading pool shed in the week of the meeting. For those people who live near the park but don’t come there to look at the bulletin boards, notices and this newsletter will be delivered to their houses well in advance of the meeting. The meeting should be a fascinating encounter between different views of how parks can serve their neighbourhoods, even at a time when there’s little available public funding for improvements. Meantime, the City of Edmonton has commissioned a bank of Phoenix bio-toilets for its downtown, and a similar model is reportedly servicing the busiest zoo in Japan. Is it Toronto’s time to try this solution, or not yet? Do park friends have the resolve to raise all the extra money the building code adaptations require? Can Parks management find the time to give the institutional support needed? Will the final plans win over the park neighbours worried about malfunction? Come to the information session after Friday Night Supper and share your thoughts.

Park News

THE CITY’S NEW DOG POLICY

From the proposed new City of Toronto Parks off-leash dog policy: “The 2008 request for ten new By-Law Enforcement Officers, including supplies and space rental costs for 6 months in 2008 will require $666,600 of Operating Budget funding and an additional $175,000 of Capital Budget funding for five new vehicles. For 2009, an annualization of $496,600 will bring the total annual Operating Budget funding to $1,163,200. In addition, approximately $405,000 per year of Parkland Capital improvements will be requested to support the installation of off-leash amenities in parks.” http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/mmis/2007/pe/agendas/2007-07-04-pe07-ar.pdf

At an additional cost of $1.6 million every year, that’s a lot of money! 40 people came to make deputations at the Parks and Environment Committee Meeting on July 4. Two deputants gave us their web site addresses, with two very different perspectives: www.highpark.org and www.playatthepark.ca.

Parks manager Sandy Straw is the lead on the new policy. The City also brought in the director of by-law enforcement from Calgary, Mr. Bill Bruce, to speak to the councillors. He emphasized Calgary’s close attention to dog licensing, strict by-law enforcement, and large number of off-leash areas.

For its new off-leash areas, the City’s report suggests mandatory dog owners’ associations, which would sign letters of agreement with the City. At the same time all unofficial off-leash dog areas will be targeted for intensive ticketing. This will have an effect on Dufferin Grove Park’s dog owners. Dufferin Grove Park staff are prepared to schedule a few park dog-policy conversations if that’s wanted (less formal than a public meeting, but open to anyone, and around a few picnic tables – a lead-up to any larger formal meeting called by the Councillor.) Should there be an official off-leash area at Dufferin Grove? If so, where? To follow up, or for more information, call Dufferin Grove Recreation staff Amy Withers, or e-mail her at awither@toronto.ca. Or call Councillor Adam Giambrone’s office at 416 392-7012.

THE ART OF THE PICNIC

On Canada Day, Dufferin Grove was full of extended-family-plus-friends picnics. Some groups had hung up flags, some people wore Canada Day t-shirts, or red and white outfits, or – failing that – at least Molson’s Canadian baseball caps. The smell of barbecues was in the air and the mood was lovely. Some people had organized kids’ egg-on-a-spoon races, some were playing frisbee, some were strumming guitars.

Dufferin Grove Park staff keep a close eye on the number and location of picnic tables, so that picnics will flourish in the park. Some of the tables are badly in need of paint, but the Parks department currently has no provision for painting them. To make sure the tables and benches don’t wear out sooner from lack of protection for the wood, Recreation staff are collaborating with park friend Michelle Webb to help her set up another picnic table painting day. The last one Michelle organized was a lot of fun and very successful. Watch the park bulletin boards and www.dufferinpark.ca for more details.

HURRAY FOR JUDY SIMUTIS AND FOR HER MOTHER MURIEL

Judy Simutis has been walking her dog Elmo in the park for years, and in the winter she bakes Rice Crispie Happy Faces for the rink snack bar whenever there’s a special occasion. On Monday of the Canada Day weekend, Judy brought over a big box with red-and-white-icing Canada Day cupcakes arranged like the Canadian flag. She had decorated the box with Canada’s coat of arms. Those cupcakes were delicious, and Judy is a person who really knows how to mark special days.

Judy often brings her mother Muriel to Friday Night Supper in her wheelchair. Later this month, it will be Muriel Simutis’ eighty-fifth birthday. Judy’s planning to bring a cake to share with the neighbourhood – as always. A chance to sing happy birthday and applaud Judy and Muriel – July 22.

WATER FOR TREES IN THE PARK

Deputy Mayor Joe Pantalone is the city’s “tree advocate." He’s made it his goal to almost double the city’s tree canopy from the current 18% to 34%, as part of Toronto’s climate change plan. The City offers free front yard trees, and in his summer newsletter, the deputy mayor reminds people that their new young trees need to be watered. “For the first two or three years, your new young tree mainly grows roots. During periods of drought, your newly planted tree needs water every day. Just two pails of water (20 liters) are all that is required.”

Park trees also need water in this dry summer. A message from garden-volunteer coordinator Jenny Cook: “Last fall 32 new trees were planted in the park. Six didn’t make it through the winter but the rest did, and they need water! If you would like to adopt a new tree please email us at gardens@dufferinpark.ca and one little tree will have a better chance of growing up in Dufferin Grove Park." Or talk to any of the park staff at the playground, pizza days or Friday Night Supper.

Parks maintenance supervisor Peter Leiss has no staff to assign to tree watering, since his staff have specified duties that don’t usually allow additions. So for now, the Recreation staff have taken up the task of keeping the trees watered during the drought. That means going all over the park with a wheelbarrow and buckets. Snack bar funds have paid for some hoses and y-connectors for the remaining water outlets in the park. But there are still not enough hoses.

Friends of trees and park shade, here’s an opportunity to help out:

  1. donate extra garden hoses even if they have leaks or
  2. adopt a tree, or
  3. help water the trees when you’re in the park (speak to park staff).

THE BIG PARK MEETING JUNE 26: DISTRESS

As everyone knows who was at that meeting, the issue of Parks and Recreation restructuring, and the silos that have resulted, never really got into the conversation. The main topic was the unhappiness of some of the park’s near neighbours about many aspects of what goes on at the park. To address some of the concerns, construction supplies and composting storage have already been relocated, and the big rotting tree trunks along the laneway will hopefully be gone by July 7. Many of the park neighbours don’t go to the park often enough to pick up the newsletters, and so they have felt left out of the loop of park plans. Consequently, the park newsletter will now be delivered to all houses on the park perimeter. Hopefully that will help. Most importantly: the park staff can be reached at 416 392-0913, or at staff@dufferinpark.ca.

SAND PIT ETIQUETTE

Age limits: A park friend writes: “I am a mother of a 5 and 9 year old. They LOVE the sandpit! I cannot get them out of it. In the park web site it says the sandpit is for older children but younger ones can play as well with supervision of a caregiver close by. I always am close by to supervise both my children but I find that people in the past have said that my 9 year old may be too old to play there. There's so much to do for little ones at the park but for the older ones the sandpit is extreme fun where their imagination soars and they feel good. Is there an age limit? “

The park staff will be reminding people this summer that the sandpit is an adventure playground built for older children. Although little ones are not barred, when it’s crowded with older kids intent on their projects, caregivers need to move their smaller charges over to the more protected sandbox inside the playground fence.

Shovels: A word about kids using real shovels to build their rivers and dams and shelters: After 14 years of using such shovels, there have been far fewer injuries than, for example, on the monkey bars in the playground. Why metal shovels? Because they work better when kids are trying to build something. Plastic shovels either break right away if they’re cheap (and broken plastic can hurt kids) or they are prohibitively expensive if heavy-duty. Occasionally there’s a child who seems unaware that s/he mustn’t swing shovels behind them. Once in a long while a child actually threatens another child with a shovel. In either of those cases, any nearby adult or older child should (and usually does) try to stop the child from using the shovel in that way. The next step is to call over a park staff and ask them to deal with the concern. (Note that in any such situation, the snack bar staff will gladly leave the snack bar immediately and attend to the child, together with the caregiver.)

Water: It took three or four years after the playground sand pit was put in, for the kids to teach adults the importance of water play. Then the adults gave in and let the kids use the hose from the park water supply. Water is fascinating to humans of any age, and when kids have a chance to make rivers and dams they can spend hours learning how water works. The more collaboration between kids, the better the water systems work – and that’s one way kids build friendships at the park.

There’s been some concern about wasting water when kids play in this way. And it would certainly be wonderful to make the kids’ little rivers available to the park trees rather than running that water down the sewer. All suggestions of how to divert the sand pit water are welcome: please bring them to the park staff. Maybe it’s also possible to think of a way of using some of the wading pool water to water the trees instead of draining that huge amount of water into the sewer at the end of every day. Ideas? Practical help? A challenge for this summer……

NEIGHBOURHOOD NEWS

Theatre, Campfire, and Food at Macgregor Park

July 7 meal at 1:30, performance 2:00, and July 8 meal at 6:30, performance 7:00

Thanks to an Ontario Trillium Foundation grant, Dufferin Grove Park campfire cook Anna Bekerman will be cooking over a campfire at MacGregor Park (Lansdowne a block north of College, west side) on July 7 and 8, making the meal that accompanies Stranger Theatre’s performance of “The World Turned Upside Down." On Saturday, July 7, the meal is at 1:30, performance 2:00. On Sunday July 8, the meal is at 6:30, performance 7:00. Free. The group also has other dates at other parks: for more information call 416-538-6084, or go to www.strangertheatre.ca.

FOOD IN THE PARK

Friday Night Suppers

Friday Night Suppers are at the picnic tables by the oven (6 to 7.30 p.m., $6 for the main plate, between $2-$3 each for soup, salad, dessert, no reservations necessary). Also, seven days a week, the playground snack bar serves good snack foods, much of it prepared from farmers’ market food. The price list reflects how much money is needed to pay for the materials that went into the food, plus a bit of fundraising for other park uses. But if your grocery money is tight, and you and your kids are hungry, even the cheap snack bar food prices may add up too fast.

If you’re hungry, but you can’t pay as much for the food, pay less. Park staff also like to do trades – if you can do something for the park (help shovel sand back into the sand play area, wash dishes, sort tools in the tool cupboard, break up wooden skids for the bread ovens) the park staff will tell you that your money won’t work at the snack bar, and you have to eat for free. That goes for kids too.

On the other hand, if you find the food very cheap and good and think it should cost more, pay more. Every penny goes to the park. (This “cookie money” is currently administered by the CEntre for LOcal research into public Space, CELOS for short. To find out how those funds are spent, go to the web site: www.dufferinpark.ca and click on “about us.”)

DUFFERIN GROVE FARMERS’ MARKET, EVERY THURSDAY 3 TO 7 PM

From Anne Freeman’s weekly market newsletter: “The variety of local produce on offer at the market continues to grow each week—it’s always nice to welcome each new addition back for another season. Time to dig out the old recipes from years past, and find new ones. For example, try making market tzaziki with Ben and Jessie Ssosnicki’s cucumbers, sheep’s milk yoghurt from Bestbaa, and Angelos Kapeleris’ olive oil. Delicious!” To get Anne’s weekly market-news e-mail, send your request to market@dufferinpark.ca.

PARK STAFF THIS SUMMER

Park recreation staff (part-time) are Amy, Sandy, Mayssan, Lea, Corey, Anna Galati, Anna Bekerman, Mario, Ted, Sarah, Christina, Karl, Erinne, Eroca, Jenny, Mary, Daryl, Zio, Ava and Fiona. Additional program helpers are Heidrun, Yo, and Gregory. Park maintenance staff (seasonal) are Joe and Ian. Lead field house washroom maintenance person is Marjorie.

For any park concerns or information, call the park staff at 416 392-0913. Or e-mail them at staff@dufferinpark.ca

Credits

Newsletter prepared by: Jutta Mason

Illustrations: Jane LowBeer

Web Site: Henrik Bechmann

Park phone: 416 392-0913

Web address: www.dufferinpark.ca

E-mail: dufferinpark@dufferinpark.ca

Park on-site part-time staff: Amy, Sandy, Mayssan, Lea, Corey, Anna Galati, Anna Bekerman, Mario, Ted, Sarah, Christina, Karl, Erinne, Eroca, Jenny, Mary, Daryl, Zio, Ava and Fiona. Additional program helpers are Heidrun, Yo, and Gregory.

Park emergencies: 416 709-0573 or 416 896-8942 (24 hours)


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